Citing Web resources

This guide provides examples for citing Web documents that are not published as part of a journal, magazine, or newspaper. A guide is also available on citing articles from databases (e.g. JSTOR).

Know that we feel your pain in trying to make sense of all of these, so feel free to contact us if you need additional help.

In MLA style, the components are arranged this way:
Author. "Document Title." Publication or Web Site Title. Name of sponsoring organization (if no sponsor or publisher is listed, use N.p. for "no publisher"), Date of publication (if no date is listed, use n.d.). Web. Date of access.

Example of MLA style:
Dews, Fred. “The Economic Benefits of Fracking.” Brookings Now. Brookings Institution, 23 Mar. 2015. Web. 17 Mar. 2017.

In APA style, the components are arranged this way:
Author. (Date of publication [if no date is listed, use n.d.]). Document title. Retrieved from [sponsor's name] website: URL

Example of APA style:
Dews, F. (2015, March 23). The economic benefits of fracking. Retrieved from the Brookings Institution website: https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brookings-now/2015/03/23/the-economic-benefits-of-fracking/

In Chicago's Notes & Bibliography style, the components are arranged this way:
Author. "Document Title." Web Site Title. Date published or last modified. Date accessed. URL.

Example:
Dews, Fred. “The Economic Benefits of Fracking.” Brookings Now. March 23, 2015. Accessed March 17, 2017. https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brookings-now/2015/03/23/the-economic-benefits-of-fracking/.

In Chicago's Author-Date system, the components are arranged this way:
Author. Year of publication. "Document Title." Title or owner of the site, month and date of publication. Date accessed. URL.

Example:
Dews, Fred. 2015. “The Economic Benefits of Fracking.” Brookings Now, March 23. Accessed March 17, 2017. https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brookings-now/2015/03/23/the-economic-benefits-of-fracking/.

In CSE's citation-sequence or citation-name style, the components are arranged this way:
Author(s). Title [Internet]. Place of publication (if not known, use [place unknown]): Publisher (if none listed, use [publisher unknown]) ; date of publication [date of latest update; date of access]. Available from: URL

Example:
Dews, F. “The economic benefits of fracking [Internet]. Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution; 2015 Mar 25 [accessed 2017 Mar 17] Available from: https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brookings-now/2015/03/23/the-economic-benefits-of-fracking/

In CSE's name-year style, the components are arranged this way:
Author(s). Title [Internet]. Date of publication. Place of publication (if not known, use [place unknown]): Publisher (if none listed, use [publisher unknown]); [updated date; date of access]. Available from: URL

Example:
Dews, F. 2015 Mar 25. “The economic benefits of fracking [Internet]. Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution. [accessed 2017 Mar 17] Available from: https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brookings-now/2015/03/23/the-economic-benefits-of-fracking/

For more information

For more detailed information and examples, consult the sources listed below.

MLA Style

MLA Handbook
Skillman Ref Desk: LB2369 .G53 2016

APA Style

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association
Skillman Ref Desk: BF 76.7 .P83 2010

Frequently Asked Questions about APA Style from the American Psychological Association.

Chicago Style

Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide from the Chicago Manual of Style Online.

Chicago Manual of Style
Skillman & Kirby Ref Desks: Z253 .U69

CSE Style

Scientific Style and Format: The CSE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers
Skillman Ref Desk: T11 .S386 2011